A Closer Look: Blogs From NASP Speakers, Leaders, and Presenters

This blog features blog posts written by experts in specific areas of practice, giving you an opportunity on your lunch break or after hours to quickly read up on a topic and learn more about implications for practice.

  • Beyond Self-Care Sunday: Four Surprising Ways to Prevent School Psychologist Burnout

    In this blog post, Dr. Rebecca Branstetter identifies four key ways that school psychologists can engage in self-care and prevent burnout in their practice, during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

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  • Five Clues in Your Data: Identifying Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    In this blog post, Dr. Laura Dilly recognizes the difficulty in identifying ASD in some children, and lays out five clues in the assessment data that can help school psychologists to better identify students with ASD, assist educators in developing appropriate goals for these students, and help them to reach their full potential.

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  • Five Questions Intern Supervisors Should Ask New Interns

    In this blog post, Meaghan C. Guiney answers five important questions for intern supervisors to ask new interns at the beginning of their internship experience. Meaghan argues that with just a few strategic questions, supervisors can start a conversation that will help them understand your supervisee and make a strong start to a great year.

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  • Restorative, Collaborative Functional Behavior Assessments and Behavior Intervention Plans

    In this blog post, Matthew Graziano, Anya Morales, Kelsie Morales and Craig Varsa discuss proactive actions that promote justice and fairness for all students, particularly those who are at risk of being marginalized because of their identities. There is a particular critical need to address the historical injustices wrought upon Black males within school settings, and the authors recommend that school psychologists begin or continue to reflect on current practices and identify those that cause harm to all marginalized students, are punitive, or are rooted in educators holding the sole authority.

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  • School Psychologists Should Embrace Telecounseling as an Option in the Post-COVID-19 World

    In this blog post, Robyn Moses and Thomas J. Sopp answer questions about the advantages of continuing to provide telecounseling services to students after the COVID-19 pandemic, including the practical benefits of doing so, as well as identifying barriers to telecounseling services that may arise for some.

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  • Stress and Anxiety: I’m Not Just the Presenter, I’m Also a Client

    In this blog post, Amy Cannava opens up about her personal experience with anxiety. She also illustrates how she helps her students deal with their own anxiety, including a list of the top ten strategies that have helped her cope personally.

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  • Problem-Solving the Complexities of Reading Comprehension

    Being able to comprehend written text is an essential life skill. Consider all the ways in which one uses reading comprehension skills in everyday life. Everything from reading the comics in the newspaper and social media online to reading the voter's pamphlet or a job application are impacted by one's comprehension skills. Because of its importance, school psychologists need to understand which reading and language skills are critical to the development of reading comprehension.

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  • Promoting School Psychological Service Delivery Through Active Self-Care

    Even though psychologists know the importance of taking care of themselves, achieving it within the complex and demanding school settings that exist in today’s educational landscape can be a serious challenge. Recognizing this dilemma and the significance of personal well-being is a critical professional skill that can have powerful impacts on job productivity and effectiveness.

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  • How to Prevent Students From Experiencing Psychosis

    Did you know that it is rather common to have strange or extraordinary experiences? Many people experience these events, and they are usually harmless and are quickly forgotten. However, sometimes these experiences can be distressing and interfere with activities. Below are some examples of unusual or extraordinary experiences that students might mention or appear to be experiencing

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  • Science-Based Case Conceptualization

    This entry to our A Closer Look blog examines science-based case conceptualization and its importance to navigating the overabundance of factors relevant or helpful for student assessment or intervention.

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  • Trauma, Stress, and the Postpandemic Opening of School: Let’s Not Pathologize Students’ Emotional Needs

    Multifaceted data has not yet been collected regarding students’ current emotional status and how many students have actually been traumatized by the current COVID-19 pandemic. This entry to our "A Closer Look" blog takes a look at considerations schools must be mindful of in order to act as conscious leaders and caring adults supporting students through these times.

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  • Testing Accommodations: From the 2019 Admissions Scandal to the Bigger Scandal of Poor Decision-Making

    Americans were shocked by the news that broke in March 2019. A number of affluent individuals, including celebrities Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman, had allegedly paid William “Rick” Singer to help their children get into selective colleges through fraudulent means. Singer’s strategies for gaming the admissions process were diverse, including faking athletic accomplishments and even lying about students’ ethnic backgrounds, but one of his techniques involved providing fraudulent college admissions test scores. Singer had associates who worked as proctors, and who could arrange for the scores. But logistical problems remained—in particular, Singer’s associates needed time to procure or produce tests with the high-scoring correct answers.

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  • Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD)

    Self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) is a trans-theoretical teaching approach that was first developed by Karen Harris and Steve Graham nearly 40 years ago. They designed the approach to fill a gap in writing instruction for students with disabilities. It can be used with individuals, in small groups, and classwide with students in grades two through twelve.

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  • Thinking Versus Knowing: The Key to Measuring Intelligence

    The pattern of strengths and weaknesses in a student’s thinking and knowing gives us information about eligibility (perhaps a specific learning disability) and direction for intervention. It is, however, critical that the way we measure how well a student thinks is not confounded by what they know.

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  • Social Media and Crisis Intervention: Opportunity and Danger

    Over 70% of Americans use some form of social media every day (Pew Research Center, 2019). As a result of this trend, when a school associated crisis occurs, it has become expected that schools will use social media to disseminate information. In addition, we should expect that today's students and their caregivers will use social media to connect with each other.

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  • Self-Care Lessons From the Field

    A 2-week Hawaiian vacation. Cozying up in thick fleece sweat pants, an oversized hoodie, and half a pint of cookie dough ice cream on a Friday night to watch your favorite movie. Taking backroads to work and marveling at the turns and hills and many shades of green along the route. Walking from the parking lot to the office, choosing not to focus on the deafening sounds of the ride-on mower zig zagging across the lawn, but instead attending to the sweet smell of fresh cut grass, brilliant sunshine, and crisp hint of autumn in the air. Self-care is different things to different people.

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