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NASP Home NASP Publications School Psychology Review (SPR) Volume 23 Issue 1 (1994) The Effects of Interactive Versus LIn...
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Volume 23, Issue 1 (1994)

The Effects of Interactive Versus LInear Video on the Levels of Attention and Comprehension of Social Behavior by Children With Attention Disorders

pp. 29—43

This study sought to establish whether the use of interactive video improved the attention and comprehension of social behavior for children identified as having attention disorders. A total of 72 children with attentional difficulties were exposed to models of classroom social behavior using either linear video or interactive video. Two combinations, positive-neutral and positive-negative, were employed in order to establish whether the presentation of a positive with a negative model resulted in higher levels of attention and comprehension than the presentation of a positive-neutral model. The results of the study indicated statistically significant treatment effects for both attention and comprehension in favor of interactive video. This effect was consistent across both levels of the model type factor. The combination of a positive with a negative model resulted in higher levels of comprehension than a positive-neutral combination, confirming existing research using live models. The findings support the view that the increased user interaction associated with interactive video may result in higher levels of attention and comprehension of information when compared to linear video presentations of behavioral models, thus providing support for the application of interactive video to social skills training.

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