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Session List

Monday, July 21, 2014

General Session
8:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Cognitive–Behavioral Strategies for Children: Evidence-Based Interventions in the Schools
Melissa Reeves, PhD, NCSP

This workshop will provide participants with specific cognitive–behavioral intervention strategies to utilize with children and adolescents in a school setting. Topics to be covered include anxiety, school refusal, depression, ADHD, aggression, traumatic stress, and bullying. Workshop objectives include an overview of the components underlying cognitive–behavioral therapy, how to utilize and teach cognitive–behavioral strategies in a school setting, and the integration and generalization of skills to the educational setting and academic instruction. Specific examples of techniques and activities will be shared.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions
1:30–4:45 p.m.

1.

The DSM-5: Implications for School Psychologists
Melissa Reeves, PhD, NCSP

This session will provide an overview of the DSM-5 diagnostic categories that most impact children and adolescents. A brief history of DSM development will be provided, with emphasis on the current shift from a categorical to a dimensional approach. The relevance of these changes to school-based mental health professionals will be explored. Also included in this session will be discussion of how these changes might influence IDEA eligibility determinations and the impact these changes will have on accessibility to interventions and community services. Changes to specific diagnostic categories that most impact children and adolescents will be the focus.

Participants will:

  • Be able to compare and contrast the diagnostic criteria for the DSM-IV and DSM-5 (for selected diagnostic categories)
  • Understand the similarities and differences of using a categorical versus a dimensional approach
  • Be exposed to new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for those diagnostic categories most relevant to children and adolescents
  • Identify how DSM-5 might be used to inform the psychoeducational evaluation
  • Identify the effect of the new diagnostic criteria on accessibility to interventions and services, both within and outside a school setting
2.

What Is an Evidence-Based Intervention? Choosing and Implementing Academic and Behavior Interventions That Work
T. Chris Riley-Tillman, PhD

While the term “evidence-based intervention” (EBI) is used throughout the educational literature, there has been limited discussion with teachers, administrators, and parents about what EBIs actually are. In addition, where to find “the list” of EBIs seems to be rather elusive to most educational professionals. This workshop will review what EBIs are across the tiers of educational service and specifically focus on Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions that can be used in the home or classroom. In addition, the Evidence Based Network (ebi.missouri.edu) will be incorporated into the workshop so that all participants take home a warehouse of intervention techniques to use in their daily practice.

Participants will:

  • Obtain a strong understanding of EBI
  • Learn the key issues when selecting an EBI for a specific case
  • Learn how to embed EBIs in a school-wide problem solving process (e.g., RTI)
  • Have access to intervention resources to use after the workshop
3.

The Perils and Pitfalls of Using Technology Ethically
Dan Florell, PhD, NCSP

Ethical decision making has become very difficult for school psychologists as more of the job requires using a variety of technology. Often, the technology is so new that school psychologists have difficulty just learning how to utilize it, and are unaware of possible ethical issues in its use. This workshop will look into the use of new technology by school psychologists and raise awareness on possible ethical issues that can arise.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify ethical standards that relate to using technology
  • Be able to describe questions that should be asked prior to using particular technologies to ensure the maintenance of client confidentiality and privacy
  • Be able to describe common ethical pitfalls when using technology
4.

Reducing School Refusal and Truancy Through Comprehensive Prevention and Intervention Within an RTI Framework
Mary Wimmer, PhD

How do we determine why a student is not coming to school? How do we identify systemic variables and contextual risk factors that contribute to school refusal and truancy? How can we engage and intervene with students who have high rates of absenteeism? With an estimate that between 5% and 28% of students engage in some type of school refusal behavior, along with the serious consequences associated with this behavior, finding the answers to these questions is critical. The good news is that researchers and practitioners have identified and developed a plethora of effective strategies to tackle this problem. Through a review of research, best practices in the field, and presentation of case studies, participants will gain an understanding of how to identify the function or reason for a student’s excessive absenteeism and design interventions based on that function, how to implement a three-tiered intervention model using evidence-based practices, and how some schools and communities are effectively addressing this problem.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Concurrent Breakout Sessions
8:30–11:45 a.m.

1.

Beyond CBM: Behavior Assessment Options for Measuring a Child’s Response to Interventions
T. Chris Rilley-Tillman, PhD

As school-wide problem-solving models such as response to intervention (RTI) become more commonly implemented, the need for a variety of formative assessment methods is quickly increasing. It is typical to hear a teacher or administrator correctly comment, “curriculum-based measurement can’t be used for all topics!” One area where there is a particular dearth in options is formative behavior assessment. This is concerning in that behavior problems are commonly cited reasons for teacher frustration. This workshop will outline the core features of problem-solving assessment for collecting data in the schools to fuel an RTI model. It will focus specifically on helping participants consider a range of behavior assessment options, with a specific focus on the use of Direct Behavior Ratings (DBRs; commonly known as daily behavior report cards) for screening and progress monitoring purposes. DBRs are a flexible and feasible method of formative behavior assessment with an extensive base of supportive research. The workshop will focus on training participants to rate accurately using DBRs and to use this method and outcome data in their daily practice to monitor a child’s response to behavioral interventions.

Participants will:

  • Obtain a strong understanding of the core elements of problem-solving assessment
  • Learn the key issues when selecting an assessment approach for a specific case
  • Learn about a variety of behavior assessment options with specific focus on Direct Behavior Rating
  • Have access to assessment resources to use after the workshop
2.

Update on Current Special Education Legal Happenings: What Every School Psychologist Needs to Know
Julie Weatherly, Esq.

Unfortunately, special education is a very litigious area, and litigation continues to be on the rise. This session will highlight current legal happenings that impact school psychologists, including important court and agency decisions related to the IDEA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Participants will:

  • Learn about special education legal issues related to school psychologists
  • Outline current and potential future developments in special education law
  • Review recent court and agency decisions relevant to the work of school psychologists
3.

Cyberbullying: The Dark Side of Technology and Adolescent Development
Dan Florell, PhD, NCSP

Cyberbullying has gone from a rare occurrence to something that occurs frequently, particularly in middle and high schools. Unfortunately, the way cyberbullying manifests is constantly evolving as technology changes. This workshop will highlight the latest technology that adolescents are using and how developmental factors in adolescence influence their use of technology to cyberbully. The workshop will then focus on possible directions for school policy and interventions.

Participants will:

  • Identify several developmental factors that influence cyberbullying
  • Learn about social media and technology that is commonly used to cyberbully
  • Describe characteristics of cyberbullying and its prevalence
  • Generate possible interventions to minimize the impact of cyberbullying in their schools
4.

Reducing School Refusal and Truancy Through Comprehensive Prevention and Intervention Within an RTI Framework
Mary Wimmer, PhD

How do we determine why a student is not coming to school? How do we identify systemic variables and contextual risk factors that contribute to school refusal and truancy? How can we engage and intervene with students who have high rates of absenteeism? With an estimate that between 5% and 28% of students engage in some type of school refusal behavior, along with the serious consequences associated with this behavior, finding the answers to these questions is critical. The good news is that researchers and practitioners have identified and developed a plethora of effective strategies to tackle this problem. Through a review of research, best practices in the field, and presentation of case studies, participants will gain an understanding of how to identify the function or reason for a student’s excessive absenteeism and design interventions based on that function, how to implement a three-tiered intervention model using evidence-based practices, and how some schools and communities are effectively addressing this problem.

General Session
1:00–4:15 p.m.

A Practical Clinical Mental Health Update for School Psychologists
Peggy Scallon, MD

Dr. Scallon will discuss the most relevant and compelling disorders in child and adolescent psychiatry affecting children’s behavior and learning in the school setting. She will discuss leading diagnoses, trends within the field, controversies, updates on medications, practical behavioral strategies, tips, and resources for school psychologists.

Participants will:

  • Review current trends and controversies within the field related to diagnosing and treating children’s mental disorders
  • Understand how the DSM-5 changes will impact diagnosis and treatment for child and adolescent psychiatric disorders
  • Learn evidence-based treatments for the major child and adolescent psychiatric disorders
  • Get helpful approaches for collaborating with a student’s community-based mental health team

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Full Day Workshops
8:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Threat and Suicide Risk Assessment: Developing a Proactive and Consistent Approach to Evaluating Risk
Melissa Reeves, PhD, NCSP

This workshop will focus on the process and procedures needed to establish a consistent school- or district-wide approach to threat and suicide risk assessment. Critical factors discussed will include current statistics and legal cases; early identification of warning signs; primary prevention strategies to break the code of silence; an overview of risk assessment models; assessment procedures; and strategies for interventions, postventions, and working with difficult parents. Case study examples and forms will be shared to illustrate the process

Multitiered Support Systems for English Learners: What’s Different?
Julie Esparza Brown, PhD

English learners comprise a unique, heterogeneous group in today’s classrooms. While their home language may be any one of over 400 languages in the United States, their proficiencies in both their language and English vary by their educational and experiential backgrounds. Further, while there are commonalities to many cultural groups, each family’s cultural values and beliefs are also unique. Thus, planning and providing appropriate assessment instruction to ensure that all English learners meet standards and their full potential in the context of their diverse ecologies is quite a challenge. This 1-day workshop will give participants the knowledge to provide English learners culturally, linguistically, and experientially appropriate core instruction and increasingly intense interventions through case studies and active participation. Strategies for including families and communities will also be presented.

Participants will:

  • Analyze children’s ecologies to understand the impact of cultural, linguistic, and experiential differences on success in an American classroom
  • Examine the reliability and validity of common screening and progress monitoring tools used with English learners
  • Tailor instruction and intervention to student’s unique profiles through use of a research-based systematic framework
  • Apply concepts learned to their own system