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Program and Sessions

Access Learning That Fits Your Needs

Take advantage of a variety of session formats at the convention. From in-depth learning to interactive sessions, you're sure to find plenty of sessions that are right for you. Attendees must wear name badges for admittance to all convention sessions.

Convention registration fee includes:

  • More than 1,000 peer-reviewed presentations (mini-skills, papers, PIEs, symposia, and posters)
  • Keynote address
  • All featured and special sessions
  • Access to the Exhibit Hall

Additional fees are required for:

  • Documented Sessions
  • NASP Convention Workshops
  • Certain optional special events
  • Session Recording Packages

Learn Valuable Skills

Mini-Skills Presentations are in-depth sessions designed to teach participants specific skills, such as research proficiencies, counseling techniques, or specific assessment methods. Each session is 1 hour 50 minutes long, allowing for comprehensive presentations and ample time for questions and answers.

NASP Convention Workshops offer half- and full-day opportunities to get intensive training on the latest issues in school psychology.

Get the Latest Research

Paper Presentations cover a broad range of topics, including innovative practice, research, program evaluation, data-based practice, and other areas of interest. Each session is scheduled for 50 minutes and includes time for questions from session participants.

Poster Presentations are visual displays that provide an informal, interactive format for the presentation of research, data, and innovative practices. Multiple posters are displayed concurrently during each 90-minute poster session. Posters on related topics are presented during the same session. Participants can read one, several, or all posters during the sessions and discuss the posters with the authors.

Interact With Colleagues

Participant Information Exchange (PIE) Sessions are round-table discussions with presenters and a small group of interested participants. Five PIEs will be scheduled during each 45-minute PIE session on Thursday and Friday.

Interest Group Networking Sessions bring together school psychologists who have similar interests and face similar challenges, ranging from adoption and foster care to urban school psychology.

Hear Different Viewpoints

Symposia Presentations include three or more papers on a common theme. Presented together, the papers provide several views on a single topic or issue. Following the presentations, a discussant provides reactions to the papers presented. Ample time for questions from participants is available during the 80-minute time blocks allocated for symposia.

Examine Profession-Wide Issues

The Keynote Address and Featured Sessions let you hear from thought leaders and profession insiders who will share their insight on the future direction of school psychology.

Special Sessions are sponsored by NASP leaders, workgroups, and committees to address specific projects and priorities of the association. Unlike mini-skills, papers, PIE sessions, posters, and symposia, the content of the 50- or 80-minute special sessions is not reviewed through the masked peer review process.

Earn Continuing Professional Development

Documented Sessions are a great way to get documented continuing professional development (CPD)! Sessions focus on a range of professional issues and cater to advanced experience levels.

SPONSORED SESSIONS

Some NASP convention sessions are financially supported by publishing companies or other sponsoring organizations. NASP is appreciative of this important support. Presenters of sponsored sessions often are the sponsoring organizations' employees or authors. Convention participants benefit from in-depth professional development in these sessions but should understand that authors' published materials are likely to be emphasized in their presentations.

Convention Committee

  • Phil Lazarus, NASP President
  • Michael C. Forcade, Convention Chair
  • Sabrina Abate, Local Arrangements
  • Alan W. Brue, Exhibits Cochair
  • Gary Feldman, Local Arrangements Cochair
  • Lisa Kelly-Vance, Chair, Professional Growth and Posters Cochair
  • Celeste M Malone, Local Student Cochair
  • Terry Molony, Local Arrangements Cochair
  • Susan Ratterree, Program Cochair
  • Mark Resnick, Convention Assistants Cochair
  • Peter S. Reynolds, Career Service Cochair
  • Todd Savage, Program Manager, Professional Development
  • Nakeia Smith, Local Student Cochair
  • Mark E. Swerdlik, Workshop Cochair

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Will School Reform Improve Education?

Wednesday, February 22, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m

NASP 2011 Annual Convention

Keynote speaker Diane Ravitch, PhD, Research Professor of Education, New York University, will offer an eye-opening perspective on the state of America's schools and the direction of current school reform efforts. Once a leading advocate for No Child Left Behind (NCLB), Ravitch has become one of its most vocal opponents and a strong defender of the public school system. She points not just to the failure of the law's imbalanced focus on standardized testing and school choice but also the inaccurate notion that schools will function better in an education “marketplace” when educators recognize that collaboration and shared innovation and responsibility are essential to successful schools. Ravitch also takes on the fallacy that America's schools are failing or in “free fall.” Although acknowledging the many serious challenges that schools face with regard to teacher training and socioeconomic realities, she looks beneath the sound-bite statistics to understand the consistency of the system's strengths—and weaknesses—over time. She argues that the current dialogue around reform is misguided, unnecessarily beating down our public school educators and distracting from a focus on what really works to improve teaching and learning.

Diane Ravitch is a historian of education and research professor of education at New York University. She is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She served as assistant secretary of education for research and improvement in the administration of President George H. W. Bush in 1991–93. She was appointed to two terms on the National Assessment Governing Board by Secretary Richard Riley in the Clinton administration and served during 1997–2004.

Ravitch is the author of 10 books, has edited 14 books, and has written more than 500 articles. Her most recent book is The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education (2010).

She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, and PEN International.

She has received nine honorary degrees; was named “Friend of Education” by the National Education Association in 2010; received the Charles W. Eliot award from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges in 2010; received the American Education Award from the American Association of School Administrators in 2011; received the Distinguished Service Award from the National Association of Secondary School Principals in 2011; and received the Alumnae Achievement Award from Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2011.

She is a graduate of the public schools of Houston, Texas. She received her BA from Wellesley College and her PhD in the history of American education from Columbia University.

FEATURED SESSIONS

FS01: NASP Distinguished Lecture: Enhancing the Emotional Well-Being of Our Nation's Urban Youth
Tuesday, February 21, 11:00–11:50 a.m.

The Distinguished Lecture, part of the NASP President's Special Strand on Urban School Psychology, will feature the 2010 convention keynote speaker Salome Thomas-EL, an urban school principal, author, and national consultant. Principal Thomas-EL will discuss the many physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and environmental changes which cause stress, and how coping can prove to be difficult for students in struggling families and communities. These students make bad choices and life-altering decisions, in many cases, because they do not possess the self-efficacy beliefs or emotional stability that they need to succeed in school and life. Principal Thomas-EL believes that self-efficacy is not about teaching students to be successful, but teaching them how to be resilient when they are not successful.

Speaker: Salome Thomas-EL, Philadelphia, PA

FS02: Education Revolution Sneak Preview With Dan Habib
Tuesday, February 21, 3:00–4:50 p.m.

Dan Habib's new film Education Revolution documents the lives of students with emotional/behavioral challenges and shows innovative educational approaches that help these students to succeed. Habib will show a preview of the film, and its central subject, Kelsey Carroll, will join him for a post screening conversation.

Speaker: Dan Habib, The University of New Hampshire Institute on Disability, Concord

FS03: Social–Emotional Learning: Preparing Students for Tests of Life, Not a Life of Tests
Wednesday, February 22, 2:30–3:50 p.m.

To guide schools toward effective prevention and intervention around problem behaviors and academic success for all, school psychologists must focus on creating school climates that are safe, challenging, caring, supportive, and respectful. Addressing bullying allows school psychologists to place students' social–emotional and character development at the center of schools' concerns.

Speaker: Maurice J. Elias, PhD, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ

FS04: Creating Safe Schools 101
Thursday, February 23, 10:00–11:20 a.m.

Students can't learn if they don't feel safe—period. In this presentation, Kevin Jennings will address how to create safe school climates that promote academic achievement and personal growth for all of our students. Drawing on his lifelong work as an educator, policy leader, and advocate on behalf of the safety and well-being of America's children and youth, Kevin will discuss the issues facing students and the challenges facing educators in providing the appropriate services and safeguards. He will bring to this discussion the lens of leadership on bullying prevention at the national level during his tenure as Assistant Secretary of Education and Director of the Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools.

Speaker: Kevin Jennings, Be the Change, Boston, MA

FS05: NASP Legends in School Psychology Address: School Psychologists' Role in Effective Education for All
Thursday, February 23, 2:00–2:50 p.m.

This session will address the efforts school psychologists and NASP have made over the past half century in equalizing effective education for all children, particularly those from neglected ethnic and economic groups and the long necessary journey ahead to reach equality. The presenter will discuss ways school psychology can address the challenges and opportunities for providing educational equality through individual practices and professional policies.

Speaker: Kevin P. Dwyer, MA, NCSP, Retired, Bethesda, MD

FS06: Safeguarding Our Youth: Promoting Emotional Well-Being and Resilience Through Crisis Intervention
Friday, February 24, 11:00 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Many of our youth have experienced tragedy and loss, and NASP has provided nationwide leadership in crisis prevention and response. This presentation will outline key prevention and intervention procedures to promote emotional well-being and resilience. Protective factors for children that have been identified by the World Health Organization will be outlined.

Speaker: Scott Poland, EdD, NCSP, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL

FS07: Moving From a Failing to an Achieving School District: How Learning Supports Helped Reach Struggling Students
Friday, February 24, 3:00–4:20 p.m.

This session will demonstrate how Upper Darby, an urban school district identified for corrective action, is improving student achievement through an infusion of educational reforms. These reforms (which include using RTII problem-solving teams and seeing student performance through multiple lenses, such as Pennsylvania's DOE-approved growth model) have proven highly effective for all students, including those who are highly mobile, English Language Learners, and/or struggling with poverty. They also have created a more prominent role for the school psychologist's data-analysis skills. Participants will gain an understanding of how state-level goals and initiatives translate to the district, school, and individual student levels.

Presenters: Dan McGarry, Julie James, Deborah Fineberg, and Brenda Kabler, Upper Darby School District, PA; Amy Smith, Department of Education, PA

President's Special Strands

Sessions within the two 2012 NASP President's Special Strands will be presented to help carry the convention theme throughout the week. These strands will include featured sessions as well as a number of sessions selected from the proposals accepted for presentation via the NASP 2012 Annual Convention Call for Presentation Proposals Review System.

Universal Prevention to Support the Emotional Needs of Our Nation's Youth

As a society, we must do more to support the emotional well-being of our nation's youth. Though the IQs of children have increased by approximately one third of a point each year, the emotional well-being of children has suffered in past decades. One out of five children needs mental health intervention of some nature to succeed in school. Both anxiety and depression in young people have increased. Within the past two decades, we have witnessed targeted school shootings which may be heard as a clarion call that warn us that our nation's youth are in trouble. The purpose of this strand is to focus on universal prevention approaches that have shown promise in supporting the whole child. Topics will include bullying prevention, social–emotional learning/character education, suicide prevention, support for military families, and school-wide positive behavior supports and interventions that improve the climate of the entire school.

FS03: Social–Emotional Learning: Preparing Students for Tests of Life, Not a Life of Tests
Wednesday, February 22, 2:30–3:50 p.m.

To guide schools toward effective prevention and intervention around problem behaviors and academic success for all, school psychologists must focus on creating school climates that are safe, challenging, caring, supportive, and respectful. Addressing bullying allows school psychologists to place students' social–emotional and character development at the center of schools' concerns.

Presenter: Maurice J. Elias, PhD, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ

FS04: Creating Safe Schools 101
Thursday, February 23, 10:00–11:20 a.m.

Students can't learn if they don't feel safe—period. In this presentation, Kevin Jennings will address how to create safe school climates that promote academic achievement and personal growth for all of our students. Drawing on his lifelong work as an educator, policy leader, and advocate on behalf of the safety and well-being of America's children and youth, Kevin will discuss the issues facing students and the challenges facing educators in providing the appropriate services and safeguards. He will bring to this discussion the lens of leadership on bullying prevention at the national level during his tenure as Assistant Secretary of Education and Director of the Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools.

Presenter: Kevin Jennings, Be the Change, Boston, MA

FS06: Safeguarding Our Youth: Promoting Emotional Well-Being and Resilience Through Crisis Intervention
Friday, February 24, 11:00 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Many of our youth have experienced tragedy and loss, and NASP has provided nationwide leadership in crisis prevention and response. This presentation will outline key prevention and intervention procedures to promote emotional well-being and resilience. Protective factors for children that have been identified by the World Health Organization will be outlined.

Presenter: Scott Poland, EdD, NCSP, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL

MS086: Techniques for Successful Data Collection: Tracking Behavioral Social Emotional Interventions
Thursday, February 23, 4:00–5:50 p.m.

This presentation will identify ways to make data collection of behavior, emotional, and social skills by classroom professionals easier and more accepted. In the context of Professional Learning Communities and consultative problem-solving teams, participants will identify the role data plays in planning, monitoring, and evaluating interventions targeting behavior, emotional, and social skills. Methods of presenting and adapting data collection for the classroom teacher or paraprofessional will be provided.

Presenter: Jennifer E. McPoyle-Callahan, South Middleton School District, Boiling Springs, PA

MS228: Addressing Social Emotional Learning Through RTI Within Early Childhood Settings
Tuesday, February 21, 4:00–5:50 p.m.

This presentation describes outcomes of a three-year process addressing social emotional learning through Response to Intervention (RtI) and Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) in a district early childhood Program (ECP). Participants will learn to address social emotional learning and gain an understanding of various data collection methods. A proposed model, preliminary outcomes, assessments, interventions, and next steps will be discussed.

Presenter: Melissa A. Brown, Glenview School District 34, Glenview, IL

SY002: School Psychologists Role in Social-Emotional Learning Within an RTI Context
Wednesday, February 22, 4:00–5:20 p.m.

We will highlight how assessment of social-emotional competence is critical to the school psychologist's role described in NASP's Model for Comprehensive and Integrated Services. A review of strength-based scales for social-emotional learning is provided and research on tools for universal screening, assessment, ongoing progress monitoring, and instructional planning will be discussed within an RTI context. Participants will learn how social-emotional skills can be assessed at all three Tiers and utilized within a comprehensive service model.

Presenter: Jack A. Naglieri, PhD, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

MS017: Fostering the Academic and Emotional Growth of English Language Learners
Thursday, February 23, 8:00–9:50 a.m.

This mini-skills workshop will provide hands-on experience with strategies for fostering academic and emotional growth in ELLs. Participants will explore various strategies for differentiating instruction and for providing additional emotional support.

Presenter: Graciela Elizalde-Utnick, Brooklyn College, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY

Related Sessions and Workshops

SS29: Reaching out to Commercially Sexually Exploited Youth
Tuesday February 21, 1:00–2:20 p.m.

SS24: A Decade At War: The Toll on Our Children
Thursday, February 23, 8:30–9:50 a.m.

WS42: Prevention and Intervention With Relational Aggression Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation
Thursday, February 23, 4:30–7:30 p.m.

MS047: Addressing Emotional Issues in Traumatized Children Within the RTI Model
Thursday, February 23, 8:00–9:50 a.m.

SY003: CBT in Schools: Advancements in Promoting Emotional Well-Being in Children
Tuesday, February 21, 2:30–3:50 p.m.

PA026: Social Emotional Learning: A Study of Implementation Process in Illinois
Friday, February 24, 11:00–11:50 a.m.

WS53: Safer, Saner Elementary Schools: Improving Behavior and Climate Using Restorative Practices Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation
Friday, February 21, 8:30–11:30 a.m.

Providing School Psychological Services in Large Urban School Districts: What Works

Every year, NASP holds its annual convention in a major urban center like Philadelphia. While we always give back to our hosts in some way, we rarely focus on the systemic needs of schools in these communities. Large urban school districts have unique challenges in educating their students. Highly concentrated rates of poverty, crime, violence, and family dysfunction provide the context for many children and youth coming to class each day. Additionally, significant populations of immigrant and culturally, ethnically, and linguistically diverse students contribute to the mosaic of needs that schools must be equipped to meet. The economic recession, as is true for many districts, has increased rates of both poverty and homelessness, while resources have been trimmed. This strand will offer insights into school psychologists' successful approaches to addressing these concerns. Presenters will discuss the practical issues involved (e.g., transportation, record keeping, mobility, Medicaid reimbursement, linking youth to mental health treatment, supervising a large number of practitioners, and more). Participants will have the opportunity to learn from and become part of a community of administrators, supervisors, and practitioners concerned with school psychology practice at the heart of the nation's most challenging—and urgent—effort to help ALL children succeed in school and life.

FS01: NASP Distinguished Lecture: Enhancing the Emotional Well-Being of our Nation's Urban Youth
Tuesday, February 21, 11:00–11:50 a.m.

The Distinguished Lecture, part of the NASP President's Special Strand on Urban School Psychology, will feature the 2010 convention keynote speaker Salome Thomas-EL, an urban school principal, author, and national consultant. Principal Thomas-EL will discuss the many physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and environmental changes which cause stress, and how coping can prove to be difficult for students in struggling families and communities. These students make bad choices and life-altering decisions, in many cases, because they do not possess the self-efficacy beliefs or emotional stability that they need to succeed in school and life. Principal Thomas-EL believes that self-efficacy is not about teaching students to be successful, but teaching them how to be resilient when they are not successful.

Presenter: Salome Thomas-EL, Philadelphia, PA

FS05: NASP Legends in School Psychology Address: School Psychologists” Role in Effective Education for All
Thursday, February 23, 2:00–2:50 p.m.

This session will address the efforts school psychologists and NASP have made over the past half century in equalizing effective education for all children, particularly those from neglected ethnic and economic groups and the long necessary journey ahead to reach equality. The presenter will discuss ways school psychology can address the challenges and opportunities for providing educational equality through individual practices and professional policies.

Presenter: Kevin P. Dwyer, MA, NCSP, Retired, Bethesda, MD

FS07: Moving From a Failing to an Achieving School District: How Learning Supports Helped Reach Struggling Students
Friday, February 24, 3:00–4:20 p.m.

This session will demonstrate how Upper Darby, an urban school district identified for corrective action, is improving student achievement through an infusion of educational reforms. These reforms (which include using RTII problem-solving teams and seeing student performance through multiple lenses, such as Pennsylvania's DOE-approved growth model) have proven highly effective for all students, including those who are highly mobile, English Language Learners, and/or struggling with poverty. They also have created a more prominent role for the school psychologist's data-analysis skills. Participants will gain an understanding of how state-level goals and initiatives translate to the district, school, and individual student levels.

Presenters: Dan McGarry, Julie James, Deborah Fineberg, and Brenda Kabler, Upper Darby School District, PA; Amy Smith, Department of Education, PA

MS088: Creating a Multi-Tiered Service Delivery Model in an Urban District
Thursday, February 23, 2:00–3:50 p.m.

This mini-skills session will detail one low-income, urban school district's process in implementing a multi-tiered service delivery model, specifically focusing on the tertiary level. Participants will learn specifically about the role of the school psychologist in the development of the tertiary level of support for academics and behavior. Examples of implementation and data tracking tools will be given so that attendees may adopt a similar system in their districts.

Presenter: Kathryn F. Sherry, Waukegan School District 60, Waukegan, IL

SY07: Successes and Challenges of RTI in the Urban Settings
Friday, February 24, 4:00–5:20 p.m.

The successes and challenges of RTI implementation in three different sized urban school settings will be presented — Brown International, a turn-around school within Denver, a district wide effort in the Upper Darby School District, a small urban setting just outside Philadelphia, and a district wide implementation in Los Angeles Unified School District, one of the largest districts in the United States. The panel will conclude with a cross-presenter discussion.

Presenter: Edward Shapiro, NCSP, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

PA478: Character Education Effects on Behavioral Outcomes in Urban Settings
Friday, February 24, 12:00–12:50 p.m.

Despite its importance to overall education, character education programs often lack empirical and theoretical support. The current study empirically-examined the Smart Character Choices (SCC) program on classroom behavioral outcomes in urban settings. Results indicate the relative effect of the SCC program compared to other important factors on classroom behavior. Participants will learn about current research in character education, behavioral outcomes when implementing the program, and directions for future research.

Presenter: David C. Parker, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

PA619: Perception of Poverty in Urban At-Risk Youth
Wednesday, February 22, 9:30–10:20 a.m.

This presentation will describe a sample of urban impoverished youth who, when compared to non- impoverished peers, reported a lower incidence of alcohol and drug use as well as higher engagement across emotional, cognitive, and behavioral domains. Characteristics of resilient children will be discussed as well as recommendations for fostering the development of resilient processes in urban youth.

Presenter: Melissa Hernandez, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Related Sessions and Meetings

PA330: Acceptance-Based Group Treatment for Externalizing Behaviors in an Urban School
Tuesday, February 21, 3:00–3:50 p.m.

PA025: Perceptions of Academic and Social Support Among Urban Youth
Thursday, February 23, 9:00–9:50 a.m.

IG19: Urban School Psychology Interest Group Networking Session
Wednesday, February 22, 8:00–9:50 a.m.

IG02: Social Justice Interest Group Networking Session
Wednesday, February 22, 2:30–3:50 p.m.

SY033: Developing Measures in Urban Settings Through Participatory Action Research
Friday, February 24, 8:30–9:50 a.m.

PA281: Expanding on an Ecological Model of Urban School Psychology
Friday, February 24, 10:00–10:50 a.m.

Get NASP-, APA-, and NBCC-Approved CPD by attending Documented Sessions

NCSPs: These sessions count toward the 10 hours of NASP- and APA-approved CPD required for renewal.
Pennsylvania Attendees: Documented Sessions are Act 48 approved.

Attendees of these 80-minute sessions will be eligible to receive documentation of attendance for 1.25 hours of NASP-, APA-, and NBCC-approved CPD credit for each session. Each of these sessions requires registration and a $5 processing fee.

Participants who want documentation of attendance will need to sign in at the beginning of each session, stay for the entire session, and complete and submit an evaluation at the end of the session. Letters of attendance verification will be distributed at the end of each session. Please note that letters of attendance verification will not be mailed to attendees.

DS01: Working With Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Students in Schools
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Tuesday, February 21, 1:00–2:20 p.m.
S. L. Colton Meier, MA, University of Houston, TX

Many parents of transgender children allow their children to socially transition, or present as the other sex, in schools. This session will inform psychologists about how to assist schools in devising suitable accommodations for these students. Professional literature on development and treatment of gender identity disorder will be reviewed.

DS02: The Stoplight Mentality: Implementing RTIWith Limited Resources
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Wednesday, February 22, 8:30–9:50 a.m.
Michelle Malvey, EdS, Thompson School District, Loveland, CO

In this session, participants will engage in a dialogue regarding the practical implementation of the components of RTI using limited resources. One moderate-sized school district will share the tools they used to move from consensus to infrastructure building and finally to implementation over a 3-year period.

DS03: Advanced School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS): Overcoming Obstacles to Implementation
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Wednesday, February 22, 4:30–5:50 p.m.
Kristin Sawka-Miller, PhD,Siena College, Loudonville, NY

This session will focus on strategies to help overcome common obstacles to high fidelity implementation of SWPBS. Challenges such as declining momentum, low staff “buy-in,” infrequent or inconsistent recognition system use, and difficulty monitoring progress will be addressed with a focus on the school psychologist's role in these efforts.

DS04: From the NASP Ethics Committee's In-Box
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Thursday, February 23, 8:00–9:20 a.m.
Leigh Armistead, EdD, NCSP, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC; Susan Jacob, PhD,Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant; Laurie Klose, PhD, Texas State University, San Marcos; Juliette Madigan, NCSP,Cleveland Municipal School District, OH; Melissa Pearrow, PhD,University of Massachusetts, Boston; and Fred Provenzano, PhD, NCSP,Private Practice, Seattle, WA

NASP's Ethical and Professional Practices Committee frequently receives inquiries from school psychologists seeking guidance about challenging situations. In this session, the committee will share questions raised by NASP members and invite participants to join in discussing contemporary issues including digital communication and recordkeeping, privileged communication, and ethical considerations related to response to intervention and mental health services.

DS05: Cyberbullying, Relational Bullying, and Physical Bullying: What Can School Psychologists Do?
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Thursday, February 23, 12:00–1:20 p.m.
Susan M. Swearer, PhD,University of Nebraska, Lincoln

School psychologists increasingly face challenges in responding to bullying among students and teachers in schools. This session will review the research on all forms of bullying and link research findings to effective interventions for reducing bullying among school-age youth.

DS06: Structural Equation Modeling for the Nonstatistician
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Thursday, February 23, 3:30–4:50 p.m.
Marley W. Watkins, PhD,Baylor University, Waco, TX

Structural equation modeling (SEM) has become common in school psychological research, yet it is unfamiliar to those without extensive statistical training. This session will provide an introduction to the methods and purposes of SEM for the nonstatistician.

DS07: Prescription Drug Misuse and Abuse Among Adolescents
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Friday, February 24, 9:00–10:20 a.m.
Anton C. Bizzell, MD,TheBizzell Group, Silver Spring, MD

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reports that more than 2.5 million teenagers between the ages of 12 and 17 abuse prescription drugs. This session will provide an overview of the prevalence of prescription drug abuse among middle and high school students and the lessons learned in preventing prescription drug abuse among this age group.

DS08: Using Single-Case Design to Measure Response to Intervention
Sessions and Workshops Qualifying for NASP and APA-Approved Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Documentation Friday, February 24, 1:00–2:20 p.m.
T. Chris Riley-Tillman, PhD,University of Missouri, Columbia

Although the use of evidence-based interventions and reliable outcome data are positive developments, optimal educational outcomes cannot be realized without an experimental approach. The primary goal of this session is to provide guidance in the use of single-case design in daily educational practice to assist in the documentation of children's response to intervention.

Note: Documented NASP-, APA, and NBCC-Approved CPD credit also can be earned through Convention Workshops.

Your convention registration fee includes more than 1,000 of the following types of peer-reviewed presentations. See a list of these sessions. Sort by title, session number, or presenter and search by keyword.

Mini-Skills Presentations

These in-depth sessions are designed to teach participants specific skills, such as research proficiencies, counseling techniques, or specific assessment methods. Each session is 1 hour 50 minutes long, allowing for comprehensive presentations and ample time for questions and answers.

Paper Presentations

A variety of NASP convention attendees will be presenting papers on a broad range of topics related to the profession of school psychology, including innovative practice, research, program evaluation, data-based practice, and other areas of interest. Each session is scheduled for 50 minutes and includes time for questions from session participants.

Participant Information Exchange (PIE) Sessions

During PIE sessions, presenters sit at round tables with a small group of interested participants. These presenters develop their topics, then engage participants in a structured discussion of their work and its application, using a list of discussion questions. Five PIEs will be scheduled during each 45-minute PIE session. PIE presenters will be solicited from among approved poster presenters.

Poster Presentations

Poster presentations are visual displays that provide an informal, interactive format for the presentation of research, data, and innovative practices. Multiple posters are displayed concurrently during each 80-minute poster session. Posters on related topics are presented during the same session. Participants can read one, several, or all posters during the sessions and discuss the posters with the authors.

Symposia Presentations

Symposia include three or more papers on a common theme. Presented together, they provide several views on a single topic or issue. Following the presentations, a discussant provides reactions to the papers presented. Ample time for questions from participants is available during the 80-minute time blocks allocated for symposia.

Special sessions are sponsored by NASP leaders, workgroups, and committees to address specific projects and priorities of the association. This year's special sessions include a wide variety of presentations. Please note that, unlike mini-skills, papers, posters, and symposia, the content of special sessions is not reviewed through the masked peer-review process. Special sessions are scheduled for 50- or 80-minute periods and include time for questions from session participants.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

SS01: Understanding and Supporting the Emotional Well-Being of Military Children
10:00–10:50 a.m.

SS27: Promoting Policies and Legislation to Ensure Safe Schools for All
11:30 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

This presentation, sponsored by the LGBTQ Workgroup, will review policies related to discrimination, harassment, and bullying in schools. Emphasis will be placed upon the disproportionate number of LGBTQ youth who are targeted on a daily basis. Discussion of state legislation and model policies will be presented.

Presenters: Jim Hanson, John Kelly, Carlos Guerrero, Liz A'Vant, and Graciela Slesaransky-Poe

SS29: Reaching Out to Commercially Sexually Exploited Youth
1:00–2:20 p.m.

This session will examine commercially sexually exploited youth and offer recommendations for how to best help these students. These youth may be subject to sexual exploitation, sex trafficking, and prostitution. Disenfranchised students, especially in urban settings, are at high risk, and schools need to respond to this growing problem. This session is sponsored by the Government and Professional Relations Committee and its Public Policy Institute.

Presenter: Jenee Littrell, Safe Schools/Healthy Students, Grossmont Union High, CA

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

SS12: Preparing for the Praxis Exam in School Psychology
8:00–9:20 a.m.

This session will present strategies to assist participants in preparing for the School Psychology Praxis Exam. The presentation will include methods, materials, and strategies for exam preparation. This session is sponsored by the National School Psychology Certification Board.

Presenters: Barbara Bole Williams, PhD, NSP, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ; Rosemary Mennuti, EdD, NCSP, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine; and Kathy Pruner, Educational Testing Service

SS14: NCSP Help for Non-NASP-Approved Program Applicants
9:00–10:20 a.m.

This session is appropriate for NCSP applicants who have completed non-NASP-approved graduate preparation programs. Participants will receive an overview of the process and will be able to ask individual questions regarding their application materials. This session is sponsored by the National School Psychology Certification Board.

Presenters: Michael Welch, NCSP, and Janet Burdsall, NCSP.

SS23: ABPP: Obtaining Board Certification in School Psychology
9:30–10:20 a.m.

The American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) is the highest credential in the specialty area of school psychology. Psychologists who complete the ABPP process are referred to as certified specialists. Becoming board certified is professionally stimulating and personally rewarding. This panel discussion will present the process involved in becoming an ABPP Board Certified School Psychologist and is sponsored by the American Board for Professional Psychology.

SS01: Understanding and Supporting the Emotional Well-Being of Military Children
10:00–10:50 a.m.

Understanding key issues affecting a military child's emotional well-being and providing support to these children is the responsibility of every school psychologist. Nearly 2 million American kids have a parent serving in the military and chances are high that a school psychologist will interact with one of these children or their parents.

This session is sponsored by the Convention Committee.

SS25: NASP Program Approval Board: Online Submission Procedures
10:00 a.m.–1:20 p.m.

School psychology programs submitting for new approval or reapproval must submit online. Participants will learn about completing online submissions, writing narrative sections, documenting assessments, reporting data, and providing evidence that meets the 2010 NASP standards. The workshop is intended for faculty and coordinators of programs planning to submit for NASP approval or reapproval. This session is sponsored by the Program Approval Board.

Presenters: Enedina García Vázquez, PhD, Chair, NASP Program Approval Board; and Susan Bartels, PhD, NCSP, Towson University, MD, member, NASP Program Approval Board

SS08: Responding to the 2011 Tohoku Japan Earthquake: Efforts to Support Students, Families, and Schools
2:30–3:50 p.m.

This session is sponsored by the International School Psychology Association.

Presenter: Shane R. Jimerson, University of California, Santa Barbara

Contributors: Toshinori Ishikuma, University of Tsukuba, Japan; Yayoi Watanabe, Hosei University, Japan; Miyoko Ozawa, Sakura Support, Japan; Nishiyama Hisako, Fukuoka University of Education, Japan; Maiko Ikeda, Consultant in School Psychology, San Diego, California; Bill Pfohl, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; Melissa Reeves, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, South Carolina; Katherine C. Cowan, National Association of School Psychologists; and Stephen Brock, Sacramento State University, California

SS02: School Psychology 2010: Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Personnel Issues
2:30–3:50 p.m.

Findings from the national study that is conducted by NASP every five years will be reported regarding issues related to race/ethnicity, gender, and personnel shortages in the field of school psychology. This session is sponsored by the Research Committee.

Presenter: Michael J. Curtis, University of South Florida, Tampa

SS05: Hitting the Ground Running: Maximizing Your First Years in Academia
4:00–5:20 p.m.

This session will provide discussion of the challenges faced by new faculty and insights about successfully navigating one's first years in the field. Speakers include early career, midcareer, and senior school psychology faculty who will share tips and reflections on how to make the most of those early years. This session is sponsored by the Early Career Workgroup.

SS17: The Indigenous Framework for School Psychology: What It Is, and How to Use Grass Roots Advocacy
4:00–5:20 p.m.

The Native American Workgroup (NAWG) has developed a framework for practice that infuses cultural validity into many aspects of NASP's model of practice. NAWG members along with members of the NASP Government and Profession Relations committee will discuss the model and its implications for service delivery, as well as how to use grass roots advocacy to influence policy.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

SS20: PREPaRE Workshop 1 Second Edition Trainer Update and Reapproval
7:30–9:30 a.m.

PREPaRE trainers only. (Contact PREPaRE Coordinator Molly Drake to register and purchase second edition materials.) Update your trainer status to the second edition of Workshop 1. After attending this session you will be approved to purchase and provide training on the latest version of the PREPaRE Workshop Crisis Prevention and Preparedness.

Presenters: Stephen E. Brock, California State University, Sacramento; and Amanda B. Nickerson, State University of New York at Buffalo

SS22: Communication Matters
8:00–9:50 a.m.

This session is sponsored by the Communications Workgroup.

SS24: A Decade at War: The Toll on Our Children
8:30–9:50 a.m.

There is probably a student in your school who has had a parent deployed at least once since the Global War on Terror began. This Special Session will review key findings about the impact of deployment and offer strategies to reach out and support the children and their families. This session is sponsored by the Convention Committee and Children's Institute.

SS04: Essential Tools for Early Career School Psychologists
9:00–10:20 a.m.

Just starting out? You're not alone. Come join the NASP Early Career Workgroup for a presentation and discussion of "hot topics" facing professionals in their first five years of practice. Gain tips, resources, and strategies for all those professional issues that keep you up at night!

SS28: Responding to Natural Disasters
9:30–10:50 a.m.

Each year, hundreds of thousands are affected by dangerous storms, floods, tornados, wildfires, hurricanes, or earthquakes. The effects of these natural disasters can be longlasting and devastating. Learn from first-hand experience with specific recent disasters how you can effectively support schools following a disaster. This session is sponsored by the National Emergency Assistance Team.

SS21: PREPaRE Workshop 2 Second Edition Trainer Update and Reapproval
9:50–10:50 a.m.

PREPaRE trainers only. (Contact PREPaRE Coordinator Molly Drake to register and purchase second edition materials.) Update your trainer status to the second edition of Workshop 2. After attending this session you will be approved to purchase and provide training on the latest version of the PREPaRE Workshop Intervention and Recovery.

Presenters: Stephen E. Brock, California State University, Sacramento; and Amanda B. Nickerson, State University of New York at Buffalo

SS07: Essentials for Internships and Bringing Your Vita to Life
11:00 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Recent graduates, practitioners, supervisors, and interview committee members will discuss how to use a vita to stand out during the application process as well as program requirements and expectations for internships. Panelists will emphasize standards and requirements, organization strategies, must-have experiences, and how to make the most of supervision. This session is sponsored by the Student Development Workgroup.

SS06: Using Your Degree for Diplomacy: Putting Advocacy Into Action
12:30–1:50 p.m.

Graduate students and early career professionals play an important role in advocating for school psychology at the local, state, and national levels. Learn about critical policy issues and concrete examples of how you, as a student or early career professional, can put advocacy efforts into action. This session is sponsored by the Student Development Workgroup.

SS11: Capitol Hill and School Psychologists: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization and Other Public Policy Updates
1:00–2:20 p.m.

This presentation provides in-depth analysis and insight into current legislation and other events occurring at the federal level related to school psychology. This session is sponsored by the Government and Professional Relations Committee.

SS25: NASP Program Approval Board: Online Submission Procedures
1:00–4:20 p.m.

SS18: International School Psychology: Information About School Psychology Around the World
2:00–3:50 p.m.

An understanding of the training, practices, and responsibilities of school psychologists in countries around the globe is valuable. This session aims to generate awareness of international school psychology and provide information to attendees interested in school psychology around the world. The session will provide information about the contemporary status of school psychology internationally and is sponsored by the International Workgroup.

Presenter: Shane R. Jimerson, PhD, NCSP, University of California, Santa Barbara.

SS16: How to Write for Communiqué
2:30–3:20 p.m.

Editors will present information on how to publish your writing in Communiqué. Priority topics, editorial guidelines, and writing style will be addressed. There will be time for questions and discussion with participants. This session is sponsored by the NASP Publications Board.

SS15: Apply for the NASP Minority Scholarship—It's Easy!
4:00–4:50 p.m.

Members of the NASP Minority Scholarship Board of Directors and recent recipients of the scholarship present important information related to applying for the NASP-ERT Minority Scholarship. Interested students and trainers are encouraged to attend. This session is sponsored by the NASP-ERT Minority Scholarship Program.

Friday, February 24, 2012

SS03: Welcoming Schools: Family Diversity, Gender Stereotyping, and Anti-Bullying in Pre-K–5
8:00–9:20 a.m.

Introduce Welcoming Schools, a program to help elementary schools take an LGBTQ-inclusive approach to family diversity, gender stereotyping, and anti-bullying. Share experiences from a local school district and its efforts to become more welcoming. Watch the new staff development film “What Do You Know: Six to Twelve Year Olds Talk About Gays and Lesbians.”

This session is sponsored by the Convention Committee.

SS09: Individual Consultation for School Psychology Programs
8:00–9:20 a.m.

Because of limited seating, this session is open only to those programs that have requested and received prior approval to attend. This session is sponsored by the Program Approval Board.

SS26: Creating Positive Outcomes With School–Community Partnerships: A Toolkit for Success
10:00–11:20 a.m.

Explore resources and plan to use the free Safe Schools/Healthy Students Web-based toolkit, connecting schools with community agencies to create systems change focused on outcomes. The toolkit provides key learnings, tools, and resources school psychologists can use to implement a comprehensive plan resulting in positive outcomes for children and youth.

This session is cosponsored by the Convention Committee and the Education Development Center.

Presenters: Jennifer Kitson, EdS, NCSP; Deborah Haber, MEd; and Kim Netter, MPH, Education Development Center, Hays, KS

SS13: NCSP New Reviewer Training
12:00–3:20 p.m.

This session is sponsored by the National School Psychology Certification Board.

Presenters: Michael Welch, NCSP; Kelly Humphreys, PhD, NCSP; Nancy Scott EdD, NCSP; and Joan Bohmann

SS10: Principals' Panel
1:00–2:20 p.m.

SS19: Come Find Out What Is Happening in International School Psychology
2:00–3:20 p.m.

This presentation highlights continuing developments in international school psychology. Participants will hear from leaders of the International School Psychology Association (ISPA), the oldest and largest of the professional associations dedicated to promoting the profession and supporting psychologists working in schools and other settings across the world. Among the areas addressed will be crisis response, school psychology program development, and faculty and student exchanges. Audience participation will be encouraged. This session is sponsored by the International School Psychology Association.

Presenters: Robert D. Clark, William Pfohl, Jurg Forster, Peter Whelley, and Paul A. Bartolo

Contributors: Helen Bakker and Coosje Griffiths