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NASP Graduate Student Research Grants

The NASP Research Committee supports student-initiated research through its Graduate Student Research Grants (GSRG). Up to three $1,000 awards are made each year to students who demonstrate exceptional ability to conduct high-quality research that furthers the mission and goals of NASP and has the potential to impact the field positively. GSRG recipients are eligible to receive $500 Travel Grants to present their research at a future NASP convention.

Eligibility and Application Information

NASP student members in either doctoral or non-doctoral school psychology training programs are eligible to apply. Applications are available in the spring for awards to be made at the next NASP Convention.

Read the application instructions

Submit your application

2015 Grant Recipients

Catherine Archambault, University of British Columbia
Catherine Archambault is a master's student in the School Psychology program at the University of British Columbia, where she is working on a thesis under the supervision of Dr. Sterett Mercer. Her research interest are in the areas of bilingual education and reading. She hopes to contribute to our understanding of the academic development of bilingual students, and to one day apply this knowledge by working with this population as a school psychologist.

Lynn Edwards, University of Minnesota
Lynn Edwards is currently a doctoral candidate in School Psychology at the University of Minnesota. Her dissertation study will examine instructional variations of the phrase drill intervention to identify the essential components of the intervention's effectiveness to improve struggling readers' oral reading fluency. The results will contribute to a growing knowledge base of causal mechanisms in reading interventions to better understand what instructional practices and components make reading interventions most efficient and effective.

Caicina Jones, Northern Illinois University
Caicina Jones is a student in Northern Illinois University's School Psychology PhD program. She is currently working on her master's thesis in School Psychology. For her thesis, she will examine the association of gender nonconformity and internalized distress as well as the mediational role of victimization due to bullying. Results of this study will inform research and practice in the areas of traditional and homophobic-themed bullying and bullying intervention.